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how do u stop oversensitized muscles from taking over?
#1
very small technical question - if one muscle has developed a lot of trigger points say the upper trapezes and you want to stimulate a bit and get the lower trapezes to start doing a bit more of the work in attaching the blades together how might you deal with this situation if you observe that the upper trapezes kicks in and just gets the job done and the movement never reaches the lower trapezes. (let's say I am talking about an exercise where I am pulling on slings that are above me to get them down.  I want the lower trapezes to work more so that the shoulder blade is not so much in an oblique position as it rounds the shoulders in walking. This is a specific example but I am interested in general - how do you work with oversensitized muscles that kick in and that just gets some other muscles progressively weaker. Even if I try to activate them the slightest move makes the more habitual muscle kick in. Any hints grateful.
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#2
Interesting question Camelia.
If I have understood the literature correctly, the angle the body takes with respect to force recruits relevant muscles. Muscles react autonomously to force, because they are intelligent and do not wait for the motor cortex to issue orders. The primary way we "control" muscles is to order them to relax. I would say, that if you are lifting yourself at an angle that recruits muscles you would rather not have active, you need to order them to relax. That means locating the muscles in question and learning how to make them let go in a situation where they are responding. Willfully contracting some muscles is actually relatively simple. For example if you lift your sternum as you are using your hands to pull yourself up, you will recruit the lower Trapezius and Latissimus.
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#3
(12-16-2018, 07:18 AM)administrator Wrote: Interesting question Camelia.
If I have understood the literature correctly, the angle the body takes with respect to force recruits relevant muscles. Muscles react autonomously to force, because they are intelligent and do not wait for the motor cortex to issue orders. The primary way we "control" muscles is to order them to relax. I would say, that if you are lifting yourself at an angle that recruits muscles you would rather not have active, you need to order them to relax. That means locating the muscles in question and learning how to make them let go in a situation where they are responding. Willfully contracting some muscles is actually relatively simple. For example if you lift your sternum as you are using your hands to pull yourself up, you will recruit the lower Trapezius and Latissimus.

Hi Frey, Happy New Year. Smile  Thank you for getting back. Will try to consider your words in practise and see how that feels. I hope this video illustrates the issue I am trying to unravel. https://www.instagram.com/p/BrIb-s7A3YQ/ The most basic reality on a practical level is that as I try to perform a move the stronger muscle kicks in faster than the other cause it has more sensitised trigger points. The other muscle (weaker/sleepy) I don't even have a sensation of. Lifting the sternum sounds like a helpful advise. Lifting the sternum automatically challenges the abdomen to release some upper abdominal contraction. To breathe then it goes into asking for some thoracic mobility which I have discovered I have compromised and it then all goes higher up as attention grabs in the area of the head where there are tensed up muscle at the back of the cranium (sub-occipital). So many muscle have to release for lower trapezius and lats to activate  - pecs, abdominal wall, back of the cranium. On a practical level are you saying to disengage muscles (which through awareness u have discovered to be overactive and compromising total body function) one can try orienting bone structures (like the sternum)  to activate desired muscles.... or is it more effective to use some kind of placement of awareness in the dominant muscle to try to deactivate it consciously (not a physical material approach) which I don't think I really know how to do, I don't think my muscles really care if I want them to relax. It seemed like u meant finding a way to relax the dominant muscle is more important but maybe misunderstood.  Smile  In this video I was more trying to sense the lower trapezes (like a trying to activate find a physical sensation in them) to get them to engage. I've edited this but the cue for raising the sternum does allow a lot more breth and helps a lot of muscles that compress the spine to release while as u said triggering the lower trapezes and lats. is it not good to just try to aim for raising the sternum. or is that not an effective way of training?
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#4
Hey Camelia,

In my personal experience training others, decreasing the load and working on eccentric contraction of a muscle or muscle group is also an effective way to retain compensatory patterns in ones strength. For example, when trying to strengthen the mid and lower trapezius groups to create more balanced support for the scapula, I often choose a direction of force that engages that muscle group, then choose an appropriate amount of force to push or pull against that allows them to feel the targeted muscle group. Then not only would I have the focus on lower and mid trapezius contraction on the concentric movement, I would also emphasize the eccentric work of these muscles in the return direction. I can try to dig up some resources to perhaps explain what I mean further...

Best,

Emily
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#5
Hi Emily, I would have to agree with you. Rosalia Clydek made this observation as well, working with eccentric, proximal driven movement seemed to solve many ticks and coordination problems.

Frey
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